Scenic Drives

Beartooth  All-American Highway

Beartooth All-American Highway

Heralded as one of the most scenic drives in the United States, the Beartooth Highway, a National Scenic Byways All-American Road, features breathtaking views of the Absaroka and Beartooth Mountains, and open high alpine plateaus dotted with countless glacial lakes, forested valleys, waterfalls and wildlife.
Location: Beartooth Mountains
Bighorn Scenic Byway

Bighorn Scenic Byway

Byway Basics: A 58-mile paved highway over the crest of the Big Horn Mountains, the byway winds past thick forest, lush meadows, waterfalls, and deep canyons. Stretching from the Powder River Basin to the Big Horn Basin, the Big Horn Byway follows US 14 from the west outside Greybull. Driving time on each Byway depends on the interests of the visitor and time of the year. Stopping to enjoy the outstanding scenery, the many points of interest, or adventures such as fishing and camping can extend travel time by several hours or even days. Along the Way: On the western end of the Big Horn Scenic Byway, Shell Creek Canyon and Shell Falls create some of the most spectacular scenery along the route. The 120-foot plunge of Shell Falls is accompanied by nature trails and interpretive signs. The site is open 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily from mid-May through mid-September. A Town Like No Other: Sheridan, a few miles east of the byway on I-90, is one of Wyoming’s hidden jewels. Voted the country’s #1 Western Town by True West magazine in 2006, Sheridan offers a combination of New West culture and Old West hospitality. Visit King’s Saddlery, at once a museum and a one stop shop for working cowboys. Pay a visit to the historic sites of Bradford Brinton Memorial & Museum and the Trail End Mansion. Also see The Sheridan Inn, dubbed the “finest hotel between Chicago and San Francisco.” And if you’re stopping by in the summer, don’t miss the polo matches. The Big Horn Polo Club and Flying H Polo Club are two of the top polo locations in North America. Sheridan is home to nine playing fields for the mallet-wielding equestrians. If You Go: Big Horn National Forest 307-674-2600 King`s Saddlery Inc. 800-443-8919 Bradford Brinton Musuem 307-672-3173 Train End State Historic Site 307-674-4589 Sheridan Inn 307-674-2178 Flying H Polo Club 307-674-9447
Location: Seridan, Wyoming
Phone: (307) 777-4862
Buffalo Bill Cody Scenic Byway

Buffalo Bill Cody Scenic Byway

Byway Basics The Buffalo Bill Cody Scenic Byway, U.S. 14/16/20, follows the North Fork of the Shoshone River through scenic Wapiti Valley to the East Entrance of Yellowstone National Park. The 27 miles of paved Scenic Byway start about 25 miles west of Cody at the Shoshone National Forest border. Normal driving time from the forest boundary to the Park is approximately 45 minutes. The byway is open to traffic year round, but the East Entrance into Yellowstone closes the first Monday of November. Along the Way A gateway community to Yellowstone National Park, Buffalo Bill’s namesake town of Cody Wyoming has plenty to offer in its own right. Visit the Cody Nite Rodeo and see why they call this town the “Rodeo Capital of the World.” Or if you prefer your beef on a plate rather than in a stadium, eat out at the Historic Irma Hotel. Have a drink at their famous cherrywood bar—a gift from Queen Victoria to Irma owner Buffalo Bill—or watch the Cody Gunfighters perform live outside. Stop over at Old Trail Town for some life-sized history. The site is home to authentic western objects and architecture, including a Hole in The Wall Gang cabin, countless pioneer and Indian artifacts, and final resting place to the real life Jeremiah Johnson. The Buffalo Bill Historical Center is a must-see. With five world-class museums under one roof, it’s no wonder they call it the “Smithsonian of the West.” Once you’re back on the road and heading west from Cody, don’t’ miss a stop at Buffalo Bill Dam. Prototype for world-famous Hoover Dam, this massive concrete wall boasts a structural height of 350 ft, its own visitor center, and a breathtaking walk along the top. From there it’s a gorgeous drive through Buffalo Bill State Park into the Wapiti Valley and the byway proper, a geologist’s dream and the country that Teddy Roosevelt once called “the most scenic 50 miles in the world.” The byway ends in spectacular fashion at Sylvan Pass (el. 8530 ft./2600 m.) with a sweeping mountain view and the East Entrance to the world’s first national park, Yellowstone.
Location: Cody, Wyoming
Chief Joseph Scenic Highway

Chief Joseph Scenic Highway

Byway Basics The Chief Joseph Scenic Byway, Wyoming 296, links the town of Cody with the Beartooth Highway and the Northeast Gate of Yellowstone National Park. The route crosses the Shoshone National Forest through the Absaroka Mountains to the Clarks Fork Valley. The 47 paved miles of the Scenic Byway run from the junction with U.S. 120, 17 miles north of Cody, northwest to their connection with U.S. 212, the Beartooth Highway. The Beartooth Mountains and the Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone River lie to the north of the road, and the Absaroka Mountains and North Absaroka Wilderness are to the south. The most predictable times to drive this highway are during the fall and summer. During the winter months snow plows keep the roadway open to just east of the entrance to Yellowstone National Park. Allow one hour minimum driving time over this stretch of Byway. Roadside History The Chief Joseph Scenic Byway is named after the Native American chief of the Nez Perce Tribe. Following the Battle of the Big Hole in Idaho in 1877, Chief Joseph fled east through Yellowstone. He and 1,000 members of his tribe ran from the US Cavalry, who were trying to force the tribe onto a reservation so that white ranchers could have their lands. While crossing Yellowstone, the Nez Perce briefly captured several tourists before going north up the Clarks Fork River. The Nez Perce were trying to flee to Canada (an 1,800 mile trek), but surrendered after the six-day Battle of the Bear Paw in northeastern Montana. The tribe was stopped only 30 miles from their destination, the Canadian border. In his speech of surrender, Chief Joseph expressed dignity and defeat with his famous words, `Hear me, my chiefs, I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.` The Nez Perce tribe was forced onto reservations in Oklahoma and Washington despite promises to allow them back on their lands. Yellowstone`s Nez Perce Creek is named for this valiant attempt at freedom.
Location: Cody, Wyoming
South Fork Road Scenic Drive

South Fork Road Scenic Drive

The road between Cody, Wyo. and Yellowstone National Park is often called “the most scenic 52 miles in America.” But for a spectacular drive that locals cherish and most visitors never discover, take a trip through the South Fork Valley.
Location: Cody, Wyoming
Kirwin Ghost Town

Kirwin Ghost Town

The ghost town of Kirwin, Wyoming is located 34 miles southwest of Meeteetse, Wyoming at the head of the the Wood River. Low quality gold and silver were discovered in this area in 1885 and prospectors began staking their claims. In 1897, the first ore was transported out of the area and the town began to grow. Kirwin’s population was about 200 people and included a sawmill, boarding houses, a hotel two stores, a post office, several cabins, stables, and sheds. In February of 1907, a huge avalanche swept through Kirwin and killed three people. After the roads were cleared that spring, everybody abandoned the site – leaving many of their belongings behind. Many of the buildings and equipment are still there today. The U.S. Forest Service and the Wyoming State Preservation Office are working together to stabilize and restore the site for future visitors. The Kirwin Ghost Town tour is an all inclusive full day tour,departing daily at 9:00am and returning approximately 4:00pm.Tour runs from June 15-August 31st(weather permitting)
Location: Meeteetse, Wyoming
Phone: 307.587.6988